Tag: greek mythology

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Joos de Momper's 'The Fall of Icarus'

Icarus and the Plebeians

Their eyes watched
His alighted, singed wing
It was this day, this moment
They stopped hearing the lark sing

The plebeians accepted
Their sentence
Lineage scoured
With cruel condescendence
See Jupiter’s glare, the tense arcus

The dust stilled, dazzling heights
Were dashed
Chariots thundered,
levity vanished, rotted, cascades
No longer thrashed

In yesteryear, they knew a rouge-colored sky
They knew of depressions and renaissances
They knew of the pitted brown winters
They knew of fresh fields calling
They now see vein’s maroon
From a high hope’s falling

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The Tale of Persephone

The Tale of Peresphone

To many, Persephone is a scandalous love story about a young girl taken from her mother by an evil, dark god. Others might view it as a twisted coming of age tale, with some not-so-subtle-allusions between “womanhood,” fertility, and the bright red colors of pomegranate that Persephone eats. A more promising and philosophically poignant meaning lies underneath the tale. What makes Persephone’s tale so tragic is its necessity: the allure of death, and death itself, is inextricable in the continuation of life, rendering us all paradoxes in disguise. We live and thrive in our dissonances and conflicts, our beauty conceived by melancholy.